USB Type C speed test: Here’s how slow your laptop’s port could be

USB Type C is the intriguing new port that began appearing in laptops, tablets, phones, and other devices well over a year ago, but we had no real way test its throughput performance until now. Thanks to Sandisk’s Extreme 900, we’re finally able to push that tiny reversible port to its limits. To do that I gathered up no fewer than eight laptops equipped with USB Type C ports, and threw in a desktop PCIe card for good measure too.

What your USB-C port isn't telling you

USB Type C is supposed to be a universal standard, but it’s just universally confusing. A USB Type C port can run at either 5Gbps or 10Gbps and still be labeled USB 3.1 by the laptop maker. USB Type C even technically supports USB 2.0 speeds at a pathetic 480Mbps. So when you see a USB Type C port, the only assumption you can make is that its transfer speeds can vary from as low as 480Mbps to as high as 10Gbps.

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10 essential pen-friendly Windows apps

Get your pen ready
surface pen

Forget about limiting yourself to typing and touchpads alone. Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book, as well as the legion of touch-enabled Windows laptops now available, are built to do far more than your standard run-of-the-mill notebooks. Whether it’s sketching out illustrations, signing documents on the fly, or jotting down quick notes, embracing the Surface Pen and Windows 10’s deep-rooted inking features truly opens another door to enhanced productivity. 

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How to uninstall QuickTime for Windows

Apple recently recommended that all Windows users uninstall QuickTime software from their PCs. If you’re running QuickTime, here’s a quick primer on how to get rid of the program on Windows Vista or later.

Why get rid of QuickTime?

qt

QuickTime for Windows.

Apple decided to cease support for QuickTime on Windows after a security company discovered two critical flaws that could allow an attacker to run malicious code on PCs running QuickTime. The flaws will not be patched with an update.

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You can dual-boot Windows 7 with Windows 10, but there’s a catch

Anudeep Gunda wants to install Windows 7 on his Windows 10 PC with a dual boot.

It’s relatively easy to install Windows 7 on a Windows 10 PC, so that you can boot from either operating system. But it won’t be free. You’ll need a copy of Windows 7, and the one you already own probably won’t work.

You might also need an optical drive.

[Have a tech question? Ask PCWorld Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector. Send your query to answer@pcworld.com.]

If you upgraded your current PC from Windows 7 to Windows 10, your Windows 7 license expired 30 days after the upgrade. An update version of Windows 7 won’t work either. You need a retail or OEM version that hasn’t been used—or has been thoroughly removed from another computer.

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Your PC has malware! Here’s how to remove it

Leonard Llangozi’s PC showed clear signs of a malware infection. “I don’t know what to do.”

Most people write to me about having a “virus,” but have nothing of the kind. Their problems are caused by failing hardware, badly written software, or their own mistakes. But Leonard’s problems, which included overused RAM and mysteriously disabled security programs, suggested something malicious.

In 2014, I wrote about the telltale signs of infection. This time, I’m going into more detail about what to do if you’re getting those telltale signs.

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Windows 10’s hidden hard drive partitions: How to find them, how to remove them

Anil Sood had three apparently unusable partitions on his laptop before upgrading to Windows 10. Now he has four. Can he make use of this seemingly wasted space?

All of those partitions, none of which are accessible in Windows, look like a lot of waste. Some of them are waste. Others are necessary. Upgrading Windows adds another one. None of them are easy to remove.

0418 laplet partitions

If you’re willing to take the risk, you can reclaim a few gigabytes by removing some of them—but only if you’re absolutely sure which ones you can safely remove.

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10 supremely useful Microsoft OneNote add-ins and tools

OneNote can do it all
onenote ink

If you embrace all of Microsoft OneNote’s capabilities, you’ll find that it can do just about anything to help you stay organized and productive. That utility doesn’t end with the core features. OneNote hooks into a ton of different services, so it’s easy to save everything from meeting notes to recipes and even emails to your digital notebook. 

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3 quick fixes for your Windows Store problems

Some days I really, really hate the Windows Store in Windows 10. For the past few days I’ve been trying to find a fix to a very specific problem with two apps that refuse to update. I haven’t solved it yet, but during my travels through the interwebs I’ve come across several easy-to-use fixes that have helped others.

If you’re currently finding that the Windows Store is not working as it should, here are three simple fixes to try before doing anything else.

Check your time and date settings

timeandlanguagewin10

Sometimes the Windows Store won’t update if your time and date settings are incorrect. To make sure they’re right, click on the time and date in the far right corner of the taskbar. In the panel that appears, select Date and time settings, which will open the settings app.

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How to make Windows 10 notifications last a little (or a lot) longer

One of the nicest features that Microsoft added to Windows 10 is the revamped Action Center and the new notifications system. Instead of just seeing a bunch of glowing icons on your taskbar, Windows 10 notifications pop out of the bottom-right side of the screen. For some people, however, these notifications might be coming and going too quickly.

By default, Microsoft sets Windows 10 notifications to pop out and stay visible for five seconds before disappearing into the Action Center. That’s a good amount of time for most people, but if you'd prefer that notifications stick around just a little bit longer, you can make that so.

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