How to go back to Windows 7 or 8 after an unwanted Windows 10 upgrade

Microsoft’s putting away the carrots and breaking out the sticks in its quest to migrate 1 billion users to Windows 10 over the next couple of years.

After pushing out the free upgrade as a Recommended update to Windows 7 and 8 users earlier this year—which means that you downloaded the initial installation bits if you use the default Windows Update, like most people should—Microsoft changed its nagging pop-up prompt in an insidious way over the past week. For the past six months, the “Get Windows 10” pop-up asked permission to start an update, but lacked a “No thanks” option, so the only way to avoid it was to close the window by pressing the X in the upper-right hand corner. Now, the pop-up says “We will upgrade you at this time,” and pressing the X counts as consent. You need to click a small, easily missed link in the pop-up to cancel the upgrade, instead.

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From bad to worse: The sad reality about Windows Phones

Everybody loves smartphones, but almost nobody loves Windows smartphones.

A majority (78 percent) of all mobile phones sold worldwide between January and March were smartphones, and smartphones sales grew by 4 percent compared to the same time period the year previous, according to a recent report by market research firm Gartner. Yet with all that smartphone activity, Windows phone sales fell even further. Actually, the word “fell” is being generous. The truth is they crashed.

Hard.

Windows mobile device market share fell below the one percent mark worldwide to 0.7 percent during the first quarter of 2016, according to Gartner. Just one year ago, Windows device sales were anemic at 2.5 percent, but that’s still many times better compared to where they are now.

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How to manage Windows 10’s People app

Bob Bishop asked me about Windows 10’s People app. “When I click on it, all I get is a partial list of my contacts, but no way of actually sending or receiving messages. So what is it for?”

People (the app) is one of three built-in Windows 10 tools intended to help us organize our lives. The other two are Mail and Calendar. They work both together and apart from each other.

[Have a tech question? Ask PCWorld Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector. Send your query to answer@pcworld.com.]

The first time you open People, you may get an odd subsection of your actual contacts. When I tried it, I got only the people and companies in my very limited Skype contacts. The really funny thing is that I don’t even have Skype on that particular computer.

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How Microsoft’s nasty new Windows 10 pop-up tricks you into upgrading

This morning, the unthinkable happened: My wife, an avowed PC user who long ago swore to never touch an Apple device, started shopping around for a Mac Mini. And it’s all thanks to Windows 10. Or rather, the nasty new way that Microsoft’s tricking Windows 7 and 8 users into automatically updating to Windows 10.

I adore Windows 10, but I’ve long been a vocal critic of the heavy-handed tactics that Microsoft’s been using to force people into the upgrade, all to hit an arbitrary goal of 1 billion users. The annoying “Get Windows 10” pop-up began using deceiving malware-like tactics months ago, but it recently received an overhaul that seems purposefully designed to confuse users who have been wearily slogging through the nagging for half a year now.

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How Microsoft’s deceptive new Windows 10 pop-up tricks you into upgrading

This morning, the unthinkable happened: My wife, an avowed PC user who long ago swore to never touch an Apple device, started shopping around for a Mac Mini. And it’s all thanks to Windows 10. Or rather, the nasty new way that Microsoft’s tricking Windows 7 and 8 users into automatically updating to Windows 10.

I adore Windows 10, but I’ve long been a vocal critic of the heavy-handed tactics that Microsoft’s been using to force people into the upgrade, all to hit a goal of migrating 1 billion users to an operating system brimming with freemium services and ads. The annoying “Get Windows 10” pop-up began using deceiving malware-like tactics months ago, but it recently received an overhaul that seems purposefully designed to confuse users who have been wearily slogging through the nagging for half a year now.

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How Microsoft’s tricky new Windows 10 pop-up deceives you into upgrading

This morning, the unthinkable happened: My wife, an avowed PC user who long ago swore to never touch an Apple device, started shopping around for a Mac Mini. And it’s all thanks to Windows 10. Or rather, the nasty new way that Microsoft’s tricking Windows 7 and 8 users into automatically updating to Windows 10.

I adore Windows 10, but I’ve long been a vocal critic of the heavy-handed tactics that Microsoft’s been using to force people into the upgrade, all to hit a goal of migrating 1 billion users to an operating system brimming with freemium services and ads. The annoying “Get Windows 10” pop-up began using deceiving malware-like tactics months ago, but it recently received an overhaul that seems purposefully designed to confuse users who have been wearily slogging through the nagging for half a year now.

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Now any Windows 10 user can complain to Microsoft using the Feedback Hub

Microsoft really, really wants to get your feedback. Not content to merely periodically ask you for your thoughts on Windows 10, the company has released its Feedback Hub to all Windows 10 users, not just Windows Insider testers.

This news comes our way from the French-language blog Thewindose (via WinBeta), which first noticed the Feedback Hub app on the store. Originally built for Windows Insider users, the Feedback Hub app lets you report bugs to Microsoft, as well as offer suggestions for making Windows 10 better.

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Why you should use the OneDrive app in Windows 10

Earlier this week, Microsoft rolled out a new Universal Windows Platform (UWP) app for OneDrive that works on PCs. If you haven’t downloaded it yet, you should, because it fills a gap in Windows 10’s native OneDrive integration. Specifically, there’s no way to see files that are in OneDrive but not on your PC.

In fact, once you get the hang of using the Windows Store app, you can choose to leave some larger files in OneDrive to create more space on your PC.

Space savers

Once you download and install OneDrive from the Windows Store, sign-in to the app with your Microsoft account, and wait for your OneDrive files to populate. Once that’s done you are ready to offload some of your files to OneDrive, while still being able to see them easily on your PC.

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