THE MALE BRAIN LOUANN BRIZENDINE PDF

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The Male Brain by Louann Brizendine. Book Summary. The cast of male hormone characters and how they affect a male's brain: Testosterone: Zeus-‐ King of the. PDF | On Oct 1, , Lay See Ong and others published Book Review: A Author of The Male Brain Dr. Louann Brizendine holds the Lynne and Marc. The Male Brain by Louann Brizendine, M.D. -- excerpt - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. From Louann Brizendine, M.D.


The Male Brain Louann Brizendine Pdf

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Read The Male Brain PDF - A Breakthrough Understanding of How Men and Boys Think by Louann Brizendine Harmony | From the author of. Love, sex and the male brain. By Louann Brizendine,. Although women the world over have been doing it for centuries, we can't really blame a guy for being a. —Newsweek “Brizendine calls The Female Brain an 'owner's manual' for women, but it's worth a look for men, too—even though we're hardwired not to read the.

Her goal is to organize her world in a web of connections so that she is at the center of it. The aggression in women is just different and, in many ways, more subtle. Power matters to both sexes. We just approach it differently. And they become obsessed with being attractive to boys.

They use subtle tools such as spreading rumors to undermine a rival. That way they can cover their tracks and hide their real intention -ie. Men self-esteem, on the other hand, is based on being independent from everyone else. One of the biggest stressors for women is losing their intimate relationships. The argument goes that men who were good at telling lies had an advantage in reproducing, and women who were better at emotional intelligence and spotting those lie had an advantage by not falling for those lies.

And when these hormones got mixed with the stress hormone cortisol, they supercharged his body and brain, preparing him for the male fight-or-flight response in reaction to challenges.

Our brains have been shaped for hundreds of thousands of years by living in status-conscious hierarchi- cal groups. And while not all teen boys want to be king of the hill, they do want to be close to the top of the pecking order, staying as far from the bottom as possible. And that can mean taking risks that get them into trouble.

It takes about eight to nine years for the teen brain to complete the remodeling it began when he entered puberty. Even though Jake was now grounded until he completed every neglected English assignment, it was still hard for him to focus his brain on schoolwork.

Now his threat and fear center—the amygdala—would activate. But it would be too late. His PFC was no match for his sexual daydreams. Soon, homework would be the last thing on his mind. Fortunately for Jake, his father came up with both a stick and a carrot—the threat of being grounded without his computer, cell phone, or TV for the next month versus a pair of tickets to a playoff game if he maintained a B average and turned in all his homework. So the next time I met with Jake, I asked him if there was anything at all that he looked forward to at school.

Boys get 70 percent of the Ds and Fs. Jake had English class fi rst thing in the morning and said it took everything he had just to stay awake. On weekends I sleep late, but it pisses off my mom. By the time a boy is fourteen, his new sleep set point is pushed an hour later than that of girls his age. Th is chronobiological shift is just the beginning of being out of sync with the opposite sex.

Nowadays, most teen boys report getting only five or six. Some parents have to unplug the Internet if they want their sons to get any sleep at all.

Like many parents, I used to think teen boys were acting bored because it was no longer cool to be excited about any- thing. But scientists have discovered that the pleasure center in the teen boy brain is nearly numb compared with this area in adults and children. As many high-school teachers know, the teen boy brain needs to be more intensely scared or shocked to become activated even the tiniest bit. The amount of stimulation it takes to make an adult cringe will barely get a rise out of a teen boy.

This preference may not change as boys reach manhood, as blockbuster moviemakers well know. Blame it on his hormones.

In a similar fashion, es- trogen and oxytocin change the way teen girls perceive reality. As he reaches manhood, these behaviors will aid him in defending and aggressively protecting his loved ones. But fi rst, he will need to learn how to control these innate impulses. Over the past year, for no good reason, Jake began to feel much more irritable and angry.

He would quickly jump to the conclusion that people he encountered were being hostile toward him. We might ask, Why did it seem the whole world suddenly turned on him? Unbeknownst to Jake, vasopressin was hormonally driving his brain to see the neutral faces of others as unfriendly.

They found that, under the influence of this hormone, the teen girls rated neutral faces as more friendly, but the boys rated the neutral faces as more unfriendly or even hostile. This may explain why the next time Jake saw Dylan, he thought his face looked angry when, in fact, Dylan was just bored. And in animal studies in which male voles were given vasopressin, it resulted in more territorial ag- gression and mate protection. In humans, a potential threat is often signaled by a facial expression.

But now everything was dif- ferent.

FREE: **THE MALE BRAIN** by Louann Brizendine eBook (PDF)

Evolutionary biologists believe seeing faces as angrier than they actually are serves an adaptive purpose for males. It allows them to quickly assess whether to fight or to run. At the same time, Jake and Dylan were also honing the ancient male survival skills of facial posturing and bluffi ng.

They were learning to hide their emotions. Some scientists be- lieve human males have retained beards and facial hair, even in warmer climates, in order to make them look fierce and hide their true emotions. In the male hierarchy of primates and humans, the angry face is used to maintain power.

FREE: **THE MALE BRAIN** by Louann Brizendine eBook (PDF)

And the angriest faces ty pi- cally belong to men with the highest testosterone, according to research. A study of teen boys in Sweden found that the ones with the most testosterone reacted more aggressively to threats. These boys with the highest testosterone also reported being more irritable and impatient. And in another study, testoster- one levels rose in response to seeing an angry face, thus dialing up the brain circuits for aggression.

So angry faces—real or imagined—ignite the male fighting spirit. As Jake and Dylan had experienced in their shoving match, this sudden anger can trigger a knee-jerk reaction—often surprising even to the fighters. But as it was, this hor- mone cocktail was keeping an irritable and sometimes irratio- nal fi re smoldering.

The teen male not only sees faces differently than he did as a boy; he also begins to perceive voices and other sounds differ- ently than he did before adolescence. And his changing hor- mones can make him hear things differently than girls his age. Liesbet Ruytjens and colleagues in the Netherlands compared the brain activity. The female brains intensely activated to both the white noise and to the music. The male brains, too, acti- vated to the music, but they deactivated to the white noise.

The screening system in their male brains was automatically turning off white noise. The best they could do was nod their heads and pretend to be listening. And these dif- ferences, too, may be primed by hormones.

James Pennebaker.

You could hardly tell them apart—their clothes a few sizes too big, slop- pily hanging off their bodies, their hair purposely left messed up, their faces marked by unshaven facial hair and pimples. But in reality, just the opposite is true. Teens are painfully sensitive to the subtle, and some- times not so subtle, feedback they get from their peers.

Neither the compliment nor the criticism would have jiggled his brain circuits at all before puberty. Evolutionary psychologists theo- rize that brain circuits like the RCZ developed in primitive so- cieties to keep people from making social mistakes that could result in being ostracized by their clans or tribes.

They were learning to hide their emotions. Some scientists be- lieve human males have retained beards and facial hair, even in warmer climates, in order to make them look fierce and hide their true emotions. And the angriest faces ty pi- cally belong to men with the highest testosterone, according to research. A study of teen boys in Sweden found that the ones with the most testosterone reacted more aggressively to threats. These boys with the highest testosterone also reported being more irritable and impatient.

And in another study, testoster- one levels rose in response to seeing an angry face, thus dialing up the brain circuits for aggression. So angry faces—real or imagined—ignite the male fighting spirit. As Jake and Dylan had experienced in their shoving match, this sudden anger can trigger a knee-jerk reaction—often surprising even to the fighters.

But as it was, this hor- mone cocktail was keeping an irritable and sometimes irratio- nal fi re smoldering. The teen male not only sees faces differently than he did as a boy; he also begins to perceive voices and other sounds differ- ently than he did before adolescence. And his changing hor- mones can make him hear things differently than girls his age. The female brains intensely activated to both the white noise and to the music.

The male brains, too, acti- vated to the music, but they deactivated to the white noise. The screening system in their male brains was automatically turning off white noise.

The best they could do was nod their heads and pretend to be listening. And these dif- ferences, too, may be primed by hormones. You could hardly tell them apart—their clothes a few sizes too big, slop- pily hanging off their bodies, their hair purposely left messed up, their faces marked by unshaven facial hair and pimples.

But in reality, just the opposite is true. Teens are painfully sensitive to the subtle, and some- times not so subtle, feedback they get from their peers.

Neither the compliment nor the criticism would have jiggled his brain circuits at all before puberty. Evolutionary psychologists theo- rize that brain circuits like the RCZ developed in primitive so- cieties to keep people from making social mistakes that could result in being ostracized by their clans or tribes.

Social ac- ceptance could make the difference between life and death. To teenagers, disapproval from peers feels like death.

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Fitting in is everything. Ever since Dylan shoved him at the game, he daydreamed about beating him up. But he felt compelled to best him at something. Thus, Jake was now practicing the posturing techniques that men use to get respect. But as most men know, a show of anger is just as often only a bluff. Still, with their high testosterone, increased irritability, and this new urge to be dominant, some teen boys do end up physically testing their place in the dominance hierarchy.

My son and I had our toe-to-toe showdown when he was just shy of his sixteenth birthday. I was awakened at two A. It woke me up from a dead sleep, and I was livid. Surprised by how intimi- dated I felt, I knew I had to stand my ground. For the moment, I had won.

But as with Jake, his fight for independence was just beginning. He was excited and confident.At those times she may have good judgment and appropriate behavior. By the time a boy is sixteen or seventeen, he will desperately seek autonomy from his par- ents. This Sometimes half the truth is worse than a lie.

Women, by contrast, sink into depression.

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The Brain in Love Melissa and Rob were talking on the phone almost every night. The cause for this preference for same-sex playmates remains largely unknown, but scientists speculate that basic brain differences may be one reason.

When love is lost, abandoned men are three to four times more likely to commit suicide. Everything you thought you knew about yourself has suddenly come undone. Female rhesus monkeys, for in- stance, learn to vocalize much earlier than do males and use every one of the seventeen vocal tones of their species all day long, every day, to communicate with one another.

At eighteen, she wanted to stay in school and graduate.

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