What Apple’s App Store changes mean for you

What Apple's App Store changes mean for you

We've been anticipating big changes for Apple's iOS App Store for some time, and now the Cupertino company is set to reveal all at its WWDC event next week.

In an interview with The Verge, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing Phil Schiller discussed how Apple will be opening its App Store subscription model, currently implemented in news and magazine apps, to all product categories. "And that includes games, which is a huge category," said Schiller.

The company's plans for the App Store's future also include a new revenue-sharing model, which will keep the current 70/30 split, but will see Apple's 30 percent cut drop down to just 15 percent once a developer has had a customer subscribed for longer than a year.

Apple adds App Store ads

Display ads will also be making their way into App Store search results, which will provide prominent placement for app developers that are willing to front the cash. Schiller stated that the system will be "fair to developers and fair for indie developers, too."

The App Review process is also getting faster. Apple claims that 50 percent of apps submitted are now reviewed within the first 24 hours, with that number reaching 90 percent by the 48 hour mark.

Share functionality will also be built into every app's 3D Touch menu, allowing users to shoot off a link to their recommended app on social media channels.

What about me?

Subscription models in iOS games and apps will surely please developers, who'll now have the option of using a brand new, recurring revenue stream to bring in the big bucks.

As for the consumer, they may be left with tough decisions on which apps they're willing to pay a monthly fee for. Juggling multiple app subscriptions could also be a headache, as being charged for several different subscriptions each month will start to add up. Consumers may need to become more selective about the apps they invest their time and money in.

That said, this could also lead to the cream rising to the top, forcing developers to up their game when it comes to putting out a product that's actually worth sticking with. If the latter holds true, that can only be good news for consumers.

If implemented well, it could act as a way to resuscitate waning interest in many apps — it may even inspire users to properly commit to apps rather than abandon them after a few days.

We're less enthused about display ads appearing in search results. However, we're willing to wait until see some examples before completely writing them off — they could make it easier for customers to get their eyes on apps and games they may have missed otherwise.

We'll find out more next week at WWDC 2016.

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How to remove the Wajam Rootkit (Removal Guide)

Wajam is an adware program that displays advertisements in search engine result pages and possibly other social sites that you visit. In order to inject these ads, Wajam will install browser extensions and Windows drivers that allow it to inject these advertisements when you browse the web.
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PCWorld’s June Digital Edition: Windows 10 Anniversary Update

The onslaught of tech information is relentless. Stay on top of the latest with PCWorld’s Digital Edition. Available as single copies or as a yearlong subscription, it highlights the best content from PCWorld.com—the most important news, the key product reviews, and the most useful features and how-to stories—in a curated Enhanced Edition for Android and iOS, as well as in a Replica Edition.

The Enhanced Edition includes videos and other interactive features—all designed for consuming on your tablet. The Replica Edition is a PDF-like version that’s enabled for your mobile device’s touchscreen.

In the June issue

We pick the 13 best new features found in Windows 10 anniversary update and look into the future of memory and storage with Intel's Bill Leszinske. Plus, 10 things you need to know about NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1080 & GTX 1070.

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New Windows 10 build brings Ink improvements, container support

Microsoft has released a new beta build of Windows 10 aimed at enhancing various aspects of the operating system, including support for the LastPass extension in the Edge browser, as the company hurtles toward releasing a major update in the coming months. 

Build 14361, released Wednesday, includes updated icons, the LastPass password manager extension for Microsoft Edge, and support for running Docker containers natively on Windows. Windows Ink, Microsoft's tools for working with pen input on a touchscreen Windows 10 device, also received several improvements.

The build is another one on the road to what Microsoft is calling the Windows 10 Anniversary Update -- a major release of its latest operating system that packs in a slew of new features. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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New Windows 10 build brings Ink improvements, container support

Microsoft has released a new beta build of Windows 10 aimed at enhancing various aspects of the operating system, including support for the LastPass extension in the Edge browser, as the company hurtles toward releasing a major update in the coming months. 

Build 14361, released Wednesday, includes updated icons, the LastPass password manager extension for Microsoft Edge, and support for running Docker containers natively on Windows. Windows Ink, Microsoft's tools for working with pen input on a touchscreen Windows 10 device, also received several improvements.

The build is another one on the road to what Microsoft is calling the Windows 10 Anniversary Update -- a major release of its latest operating system that packs in a slew of new features. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Forget USB ports, cable-free laptops aren’t far away now

Forget USB ports, cable-free laptops aren't far away now

A wide range of connectivity is obviously important, but nobody likes ports and cables which clutter up the place – but the good news is that the likes of USB ports are decidedly on the wane as we look towards a future of wireless notebooks that dispense with physical connectors completely.

That's the word from a new study conducted by ABI Research, which observed that USB-Type C and Thunderbolt 3.0 will be the last type of physical ports in existence because their successors will be wireless alternatives.

What wireless alternatives? Namely WiGig (Wireless Gigabit, aka 802.11ad) which offers blazingly fast wireless speeds, and is already in use with some laptops and docking stations including hardware from Dell, Asus and Acer which will be shipping this year.

Slow and steady transition

ABI Research notes that momentum will then build going forward, and not just for laptops and PCs but mobile devices and the likes of displays. That said, the transition to WiGig is likely to be a slow and steady one, with notebooks keeping some ports (or perhaps just one port) to maintain compatibility with legacy hardware and for other reasons.

Andrew Zignani, Industry Analyst at ABI, commented: "We anticipate there to be WiGig-enabled devices that use physical cables, such as the USB-Type C for charging or to assist in dealing with legacy equipment when not at home or when wireless connectivity is not available.

"It will take some time for WiGig-enabled displays, projectors, televisions, and accessories to come to market, so many devices will still need to have the option of a physical connection through USB-Type C and Thunderbolt 3.0 for the foreseeable future."

So while we can't wave goodbye to physical ports just yet, the writing is clearly on the wall for where connectivity is headed.

Via: The Register

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