THE COMMAND LINE CRASH COURSE PDF

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COMMAND LINE CRASH COURSE. 1 | Page. The Command Line Crash Course : computerescue.info 1. Table Of Contents. 2. Preface. 3. Appendix A: Command Line Crash Course. This appendix is a quick super fast course in using the command line. download The Python 2 Course Zed A. Shaw, you'll get a professional quality PDF and hours of HD Video, all DRM-free and. Command Line Crash Course Hold down the Cmd key and hit the spacebar. People used to work with a program called cmd, but it's not nearly as usable as.


The Command Line Crash Course Pdf

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The Command Line Crash Course Controlling Your Computer From The Terminal. Zed A. Shaw. Version , Mar Contents · Preface · Introduction: Shut. Learn Unix Line the Hard Way - Pre-Order Learn Unix The Hard Way is a full course in manual system administration of Linux, BSD, and . Professional PDF. A crash course on the Unix command line. For readers coming from Windows or ( to a lesser but still significant extent) macOS, the Unix command line may be.

This takes some getting used to! Capitalization matters! Documents and documents are not the same thing. Spaces matter! Otherwise it'll think you're passing multiple arguments or commands.

Man Pages and Google as your Map What happens when you want to know what a command does or forget what options are available? For that, we use the "man" manual pages. It's a command that you can feed any other command to and it'll bring up the help for it. Alternatively, you could just Google it. Scroll down with the arrow keys to see more or press q to quit.

We'll use the man pages to explain the coming commands a bit more.

Where are we now? Now we're ready to poke around a bit. Your Current Directory Type pwd to see what our current working directory is View Directory Contents To see the contents of your current directory, use ls.

A Crash Course in Ruby

Use the a option with ls, i. Hidden file names are preceded by a period. There are a few that you'll get particularly familiar with in the coming weeks.

You can pass ls the l option for "long", which outputs a lot more information about each file or folder.

Command line crash course pdf

There are several interesting columns, but the one to the left, which might look like -rw-r--r-- , represents the permissions for a given file. We won't cover file permissions here, but check out the flossmanual on permissions if you'd like to learn more. You can pass multiple options by just combining them, e. Open a File or Directory Finally, if you want to open a file or directory, just use the open command!

It will open in whatever default application you've previously set up so folders open in the Finder. Windows: start Directories You're probably familiar with file directories, e. They are alive and well on the command line, and you'll spend plenty of time navigating through them. A few quick points about directories: No matter which directory you're in, you should see at the top the.

When you enter a command and pass it a directory, it starts looking at the current directory pwd by default. If you want to play with a file in another directory, you can either specify it relative to the current one by using..

Command-line-crash-course-pdf.pdf

Try looking at the contents of nearby directories using absolute and relative paths and the ls command. Helpful Notes II Here are a few more helpful pointers now that you're able to look around: When you're typing file names and many other things on the command line, use the TAB key to autocomplete the word. This will save you tons of time. It will automatically fill in the remainder of the word once you've typed enough to uniquely identify it.

Pressing the UP key will cycle through the history of recently used commands. Very handy. These may not seem too helpful yet since you're entering only very short commands but it saves a lot of time when you copy-paste longer strings or cycle through a previous command and want to change something at the very beginning. Use tabs! It'll save heartache. Whenever you've opened a dialogue on the command line e. This is conventional for pretty much anything. This is a good way to get out of anything the q key won't jump you out of.

Let's Move Around Okay, you know where you are and you can look around. Let's move around! That's the job of the cd command for "Change Directory". Check out its man page! Change Directories Use cd.. Try jumping around to different directories and then displaying their contents with ls.

You can open the files with the previously-mentioned open command. If you want to specify the exact application to use for opening a file, use open -a TextEdit foo. Note that foo is what we usually call example filenames. Let's Make and Destroy Stuff You're a pro at navigating and inspecting directories, now let's make and destroy files and directories. Make a Directory Check out the man page for mkdir -- it lets us create a new folder.

Just pass it a name or path, and POOF the directory is created. The -p flag lets us nest folders.

Try it! Make A File Now create a new file called test. If it doesn't exist, touch will create the blank file. Open a File Now open test. The command line is a very useful place to become familiar with but it actually only takes a dozen or so commands to get there and that's what we'll cover in this lesson. You'll become very familiar with those commands too because you'll be using them constantly.

It can be pretty scary for beginners to open up the command line because it seems like you can mess up your computer by typing the wrong thing but, again, we'll be working well within the safe zone and you've got nothing to fear. You might want to jump ahead to the installations assignment and use the "Git Bash" application you'll install there instead of using the default Command Prompt. That way you can be sure all the commands will be the same.

We've packed the Resources tab with links to more stuff including more advanced commands but everything you need to start with is covered below. It's actually a program itself that gives us a window into our operating system and lets us run commands.

We interact with it using a simple scripting language that we type directly onto the prompt. From the Command Line, you can navigate your file system just like you would by double clicking on folder icons in the Finder.

You can also run other programs directly, or even load up a file containing a whole batch of commands to run. The Command Line is fully text-based, so you'll need to type everything in and can pretty much forget about the mouse. There are some tools that help you visualize things, but you'll have to get onto the Command Line sooner or later to do something.

The most important part of learning it, therefore, is getting a good conceptual model of what's going on and using those dozen-or-so commands we'll cover to navigate through it. For our purposes, we'll use a classic "house with rooms" model to think about the organization of your computer's file system.

When you fire up the command line, you'll be in one room and then you'll need to navigate your way to wherever you want to be. Before we get there, though, let's actually locate our command line. For Mac users, you'll need to find the Terminal program.

There are several ways to locate it:. What happens when you want to know what a command does or forget what options are available?

For that, we use the "man" manual pages. It's a command that you can feed any other command to and it'll bring up the help for it. Alternatively, you could just Google it. Type pwd to see what our current working directory is To see the contents of your current directory, use ls. Use the a option with ls , i. Hidden file names are preceded by a period. There are a few that you'll get particularly familiar with in the coming weeks.

You can pass ls the l option for "long", which outputs a lot more information about each file or folder. There are several interesting columns, but the one to the left, which might look like -rw-r--r-- , represents the permissions for a given file. We won't cover file permissions here, but check out the flossmanual on permissions if you'd like to learn more.

Finally, if you want to open a file or directory, just use the open command! It will open in whatever default application you've previously set up so folders open in the Finder. You're probably familiar with file directories, e. They are alive and well on the command line, and you'll spend plenty of time navigating through them.

A few quick points about directories:. Try looking at the contents of nearby directories using absolute and relative paths and the ls command. Okay, you know where you are and you can look around. Let's move around! That's the job of the cd command for "Change Directory". Check out its man page!

Try jumping around to different directories and then displaying their contents with ls. You can open the files with the previously-mentioned open command. If you want to specify the exact application to use for opening a file, use open -a TextEdit foo.

Note that foo is what we usually call example filenames. You're a pro at navigating and inspecting directories, now let's make and destroy files and directories. Check out the man page for mkdir -- it lets us create a new folder. Just pass it a name or path, and POOF the directory is created. The -p flag lets us nest folders. Try it! Now create a new file called test. If it doesn't exist, touch will create the blank file. Now open test.

The Command Line Crash Course

Specify the TextEdit program if you must. Type something into it and save it. I've typed just Hello World! Now if we want to read the file and dump its contents into the terminal, use the cat command. The "Move" command, mv will let you either rename a file by "moving" it to the same location but with a different name or actually move it by specifying a different target directory.

Check out the man page for some of the options, but basically it takes the name and path of the current file then the name of where you want it to go. Use cp to copy a file to a new location or name, with the same syntax as mv. Note that both cp and mv can be destructive because, if you try to move a file onto one that already exists, it will do so without warning you.

Use the -i option to make sure it warns you if you're about to overwrite something. You won't be able to remove a directory that contains files unless you pass it the -R option. Only do this if you're absolutely sure! This is one of those commands that can delete a lot of files very quickly from your hard drive Some files on the computer are protected. You wouldn't want just anyone to be able to change some of the core commands on your system, right?

Sometimes, like during an installation, you come across these files or commands you'll probably get an error message to that effect. That's why there's the concept of the "Super User", who has the power to do anything.

Use the sudo command prior to any other command to run it as the "Super User". That's you, but you need to remind your computer by entering your administrator password.

When you enter passwords on the command line, it won't look like anything is being typed but don't worry, it is. The lack of output is for your protection too. We've just covered all the commands you'll need to use for a long time but that doesn't mean that there aren't more helpful ones out there.

This lets you do things like searching through, sorting, or combining files. Though interesting and helpful, these aren't necessary for you to know off the bat. If you're curious, check out the following lessons from Floss Manuals and follow along:.

Here's an uncommon but really confusing situation. What's happening? You've probably opened it up in the VIM text editor, which is created specially for advanced developers. It has its own syntax, so don't panic.

From the first result on Stack Overflow:. So now you're pretty comfortable with the command line. A basic understanding of how it works will help you customize it in the next lesson and should give you a better mental model of what's going on. Essentially, when you start a new command line window, you're firing up a configuration file and logging into the shell.

That configuration file has some handy stuff that you'll get to edit later. It's a bunch of output, but you should be able to look through them and see some you can figure out.

They will be separated with colons: If you want to know which location a given command or program is running from, use the which command. We'll use which in the future to verify which version of certain programs you are using. When Bash first opens up, it looks for a configuration file called.

That file can contain commands and variables that help you to configure the shell properly.

You may not have a.Including Windows up-front ensures that whoever picks up the book can make use of it immediately, no matter which computer they happen to be sitting in front of.

We recently asked coaches to submit their favorite defending drills and. Let's Make and Destroy Stuff You're a pro at navigating and inspecting directories, now let's make and destroy files and directories. Alternatively, you could just Google it. The command line Terminal on a Mac, Command Prompt on Windows is your window into your computer and your home base for doing development work. The first thing to know is the default scope inside a class is public so you do not have to specify it explicitly.

Switched-capacitor filter design considerations.

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